52 eye-opening global health videos on youtube

http://mastersofpublichealth.org/52-eye-opening-global-health-videos-on-youtube.html

Whether you are new to public health or a seasoned expert, these videos will likely teach you things you never knew and inspire you to take on the world.

Advertisements

It’s HERE! National Public Health Week!

Woooo! Check out the cool events this week!

State of the Planet

On March 25: Look for a state of the union address unlike any other–State of the Planet 2010.

A biennial conference, hosted by the Earth Institute and The Economist, watch the world’s most influential and innovative thinkers tackle critical issues facing the world including: climate change, poverty, economic recovery and international systems.

Clearly all these issues greatly affect public health (a topic of  import to PHC), but this post will place focus particularly on poverty.

A short list of infectious diseases, treatable with inexpensive generic drugs, accounts for 70-90% of all childhood illness and death in the developing world — a truly appalling statistic.

These enormous global health disparities cause thousands of global citizens—sons, daughters, mothers, and fathers—to die each day from diseases for which cures were discovered decades ago. Such deaths do not come from disease as much as from complacency: killed by conditions that could be prevented with simple, affordable remedies: vaccinations, bednets, anti-malarials, hand sanitizer and antibiotics.

Disease has practically become an accepted part of life in impoverished communities, yet treatments are available for less than a cup of coffee. So what can be done?

Here is a list of some of the more innovative approaches to improve health or reduce costs for the poorest of the poor:

Selling to the poor: Social enterprises likes HealthStore Foundation attempt to use market mechanisms to create a private alternative for sustainable access to low-cost, high-quality medications.

Health Impact Fund: Yale’s own Thomas Pogge is leading the charge to radically change Pharma’s global IP policies by incentivizing R&D expenditure that would address substantial reductions in global burden of disease.

PATH‘s Malaria Vaccine Initiative: Funded by the Gates Foundation, a collaborative effort to create a whole new type of vaccine will save millions of lives.

The Power of the Text: FrontlineSMS:Medic leverages the power of the cell phone to save lives in developing countries.

charity:water: No one brings clean drinking water to people in developing nations better than CW. 100% of proceeds go to fund water projects.

Article on Global Citizenship

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/elizabeth-h-bradley/health-care-crisis-cant-b_b_216135.html

Global Health Pie!

Check out “More Pie,” a two-minute, fun film about global health funding! I wrote, directed, and edited this video while interning at Physicians for Human Rights during summer 2009.

Policy makers, NGOs, and activists often discuss whether US funding for global health disproportionately supports HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment. They pit HIV/AIDS funding against support for other diseases, such as malaria, cancer, or TB (for an example, take a look at this Boston Globe Op-Ed). These diseases should not be portrayed competing for funding! The conversation should turn to how we can increase funding for all of them in order to build comprehensive health systems.

“More Pie” tries to make the global health funding debate accessible and understandable, helping catalyze advocacy efforts. Check out the video and share it with your friends!

Nutrition Labels

A Makeover for Food Labels

By TARA PARKER-POPE

Nearly two decades ago, Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act, requiring packaged foods to carry a detailed nutrition facts label.

For the most part, the label has an easy-to-follow format that lists calories, serving size and ingredients. But now the consumer advocacy group Center for Science in the Public Interest wants to give the food facts label a makeover.

The center says the makeover is necessary to clarify and highlight important parts of the label and also to prevent unnecessary and misleading words from confusing consumers. Among the suggested changes to the food label:

  1. Put calorie and serving size information in larger type at the top of the label so it’s immediately clear how much you are eating.
  2. Make the ingredient list easier to read by printing it in regular type instead of all capital letters. Use bullets to separate ingredients rather than allowing them to all run together.
  3. List minor ingredients and allergens separately from the main ingredient list. Highlight allergy information in red.
  4. List similar ingredients together and show the percentage by weight. For instance, sugar, corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup and grape juice concentrate are all forms of sugar and should be listed in parenthesis under the catchall heading “sugars.”
  5. Use red labeling and the word “high” when a product has more than 20 percent of the daily recommendation for fats, sugars, sodium or cholesterol.
  6. Make it clear which sugars are added to the product versus those that occur naturally.
  7. Display prominently the percentage of whole grains contained in a product.
  8. List caffeine content.

To look at an example of the suggested changes, click on the image above.

I was especially surprised by how much easier it is to read the ingredient list when lower case letters and bullets are used. I also liked the larger calorie information at the top of the label.

To learn more about the history of food labeling, here’s an interesting timeline from the Fooducate blog. And to learn more about the C.S.P.I. report, click here.

What do you think of the proposed label changes? Do you have suggestions for improving the food facts label?

World AIDS Day

I thought I would share two things to help commemorate this year’s World AIDS Day.

First, a great video from avert.org:

Second, an Opinions piece I had in the Yale Daily News regarding World AIDS Day.